Xen IO performance issues

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Xen IO performance issues

marki

Hi,

We're having trouble with a dd "benchmark". Even though that probably
doesn't mean much since multiple concurrent jobs using a benckmark like
FIO for example work ok, I'd like to understand where the bottleneck is
/ why this behaves differently.

In ESXi it looks like the following and speed is high: (iostat output
below)

(kernel 4.4)
Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
dm-5              0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00  
2048.00   142.66  272.65    0.00  272.65   1.95 100.00
sdb               0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00  
2048.00   141.71  270.89    0.00  270.89   1.95 100.00

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
8192000000 bytes (8.2 GB, 7.6 GiB) copied, 9.70912 s, 844 MB/s

Now in a Xen DomU running kernel 4.4 it looks like the following and
speed is low / not what we're used to:

Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
dm-0              0.00     0.00    0.00  100.00     0.00    99.00  
2027.52     1.45   14.56    0.00   14.56  10.00 100.00
xvdb              0.00     0.00    0.00 2388.00     0.00    99.44    
85.28    11.74    4.92    0.00    4.92   0.42  99.20

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
1376059392 bytes (1.4 GB, 1.3 GiB) copied, 7.09965 s, 194 MB/s

Note the low queue depth on the LVM device and additionally the low
request size on the virtual disk.

(As in the ESXi VM there's an LVM layer inside the DomU but it doesn't
matter whether it's there or not.)



Inside Dom0 it looks like this:

This is the VHD:
Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
dm-13             0.00     0.00    0.00 2638.00     0.00   105.72    
82.08    11.67    4.42    0.00    4.42   0.36  94.00

This is the SAN:
Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
dm-0              0.00  2423.00    0.00  216.00     0.00   105.71  
1002.26     0.95    4.39    0.00    4.39   4.35  94.00

And these are the individual paths on the SAN (multipathing):

Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
sdg               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    53.09  
1006.67     0.50    4.63    0.00    4.63   4.59  49.60
sdl               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    52.62  
997.85     0.44    4.04    0.00    4.04   4.04  43.60



The above applies to HV + HVPVM modes using kernel 4.4 in the DomU.

The following applies to a HV or PV DomU running kernel 3.12:

Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
dm-1              0.00     0.00   41.00 7013.00     0.73   301.16    
87.65   142.78   20.44    5.17   20.53   0.14 100.00
xvdb              0.00     0.00   41.00 7023.00     0.73   301.59    
87.65   141.80   20.27    5.17   20.36   0.14 100.00

(Which is better but still not great.)



Any explanations on this one?

Thanks

marki

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Re: Xen IO performance issues

marki
On 2018-09-19 20:35, Sarah Newman wrote:

> On 09/14/2018 04:04 AM, marki wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> We're having trouble with a dd "benchmark". Even though that probably
>> doesn't mean much since multiple concurrent jobs using a benckmark
>> like FIO for
>> example work ok, I'd like to understand where the bottleneck is / why
>> this behaves differently.
>>
>> In ESXi it looks like the following and speed is high: (iostat output
>> below)
>>
>> (kernel 4.4)
>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>> dm-5              0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00 
>> 2048.00   142.66  272.65    0.00  272.65   1.95 100.00
>> sdb               0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00 
>> 2048.00   141.71  270.89    0.00  270.89   1.95 100.00
>>
>> # dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
>> 8192000000 bytes (8.2 GB, 7.6 GiB) copied, 9.70912 s, 844 MB/s
>>
>> Now in a Xen DomU running kernel 4.4 it looks like the following and
>> speed is low / not what we're used to:
>>
>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>> dm-0              0.00     0.00    0.00  100.00     0.00    99.00 
>> 2027.52     1.45   14.56    0.00   14.56  10.00 100.00
>> xvdb              0.00     0.00    0.00 2388.00     0.00    99.44   
>> 85.28    11.74    4.92    0.00    4.92   0.42  99.20
>>
>> # dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
>> 1376059392 bytes (1.4 GB, 1.3 GiB) copied, 7.09965 s, 194 MB/s
>>
>> Note the low queue depth on the LVM device and additionally the low
>> request size on the virtual disk.
>>
>> (As in the ESXi VM there's an LVM layer inside the DomU but it doesn't
>> matter whether it's there or not.)
>>
>>
>>
>> Inside Dom0 it looks like this:
>>
>> This is the VHD:
>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>> dm-13             0.00     0.00    0.00 2638.00     0.00   105.72   
>> 82.08    11.67    4.42    0.00    4.42   0.36  94.00
>>
>> This is the SAN:
>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>> dm-0              0.00  2423.00    0.00  216.00     0.00   105.71 
>> 1002.26     0.95    4.39    0.00    4.39   4.35  94.00
>>
>> And these are the individual paths on the SAN (multipathing):
>>
>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>> sdg               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    53.09 
>> 1006.67     0.50    4.63    0.00    4.63   4.59  49.60
>> sdl               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    52.62  
>> 997.85     0.44    4.04    0.00    4.04   4.04  43.60
>>
>>
>>
>> The above applies to HV + HVPVM modes using kernel 4.4 in the DomU.
>>
>> The following applies to a HV or PV DomU running kernel 3.12:
>>
>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>> dm-1              0.00     0.00   41.00 7013.00     0.73   301.16   
>> 87.65   142.78   20.44    5.17   20.53   0.14 100.00
>> xvdb              0.00     0.00   41.00 7023.00     0.73   301.59   
>> 87.65   141.80   20.27    5.17   20.36   0.14 100.00
>>
>> (Which is better but still not great.)
>>
>>
>>
>> Any explanations on this one?
>>
>
> If you figure it out let us know, it's been on my todo list to work on
> for a bit now.
>
> --Sarah

Hey,

Well, it's the stupid ring buffer with 11 slots with 4 kB each between
domU and dom0. This gives a maximum request size of 88 sectors (0,5 kB
each) = 44 kB.

What's clear is that for modern storage like SSD arrays or NVMe disks,
this simply won't cut it and Xen is a no-go...

I'd love if someone could tell me something different and/or how to
optimize.

What still remains to be answered is the additional issue with low queue
size (avgqu-sz).

 From your response I guess this may need to go to the Dev list instead
of here (since noone seems to have a clue about obvious
questions/benchmarks).
I wonder what kind of workloads people run on Xen. Can't be much =D

Bye,
Marki


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Re: Xen IO performance issues

Hans van Kranenburg-2
Hi,

On 09/19/2018 09:19 PM, marki wrote:

> On 2018-09-19 20:35, Sarah Newman wrote:
>> On 09/14/2018 04:04 AM, marki wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> We're having trouble with a dd "benchmark". Even though that probably
>>> doesn't mean much since multiple concurrent jobs using a benckmark
>>> like FIO for
>>> example work ok, I'd like to understand where the bottleneck is / why
>>> this behaves differently.
>>>
>>> In ESXi it looks like the following and speed is high: (iostat output
>>> below)
>>>
>>> (kernel 4.4)
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-5              0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00 
>>> 2048.00   142.66  272.65    0.00  272.65   1.95 100.00
>>> sdb               0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00 
>>> 2048.00   141.71  270.89    0.00  270.89   1.95 100.00
>>>
>>> # dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
>>> 8192000000 bytes (8.2 GB, 7.6 GiB) copied, 9.70912 s, 844 MB/s
>>>
>>> Now in a Xen DomU running kernel 4.4 it looks like the following and
>>> speed is low / not what we're used to:
>>>
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-0              0.00     0.00    0.00  100.00     0.00    99.00 
>>> 2027.52     1.45   14.56    0.00   14.56  10.00 100.00
>>> xvdb              0.00     0.00    0.00 2388.00     0.00    99.44   
>>> 85.28    11.74    4.92    0.00    4.92   0.42  99.20
>>>
>>> # dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
>>> 1376059392 bytes (1.4 GB, 1.3 GiB) copied, 7.09965 s, 194 MB/s

Interesting.

* Which Xen version are you using?
* Which Linux kernel version is being used in the dom0?
* Is this a PV, HVM or PVH guest?
* ...more details you can share?

>>> Note the low queue depth on the LVM device and additionally the low
>>> request size on the virtual disk.
>>>
>>> (As in the ESXi VM there's an LVM layer inside the DomU but it
>>> doesn't matter whether it's there or not.)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Inside Dom0 it looks like this:
>>>
>>> This is the VHD:
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-13             0.00     0.00    0.00 2638.00     0.00   105.72   
>>> 82.08    11.67    4.42    0.00    4.42   0.36  94.00
>>>
>>> This is the SAN:
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-0              0.00  2423.00    0.00  216.00     0.00   105.71 
>>> 1002.26     0.95    4.39    0.00    4.39   4.35  94.00
>>>
>>> And these are the individual paths on the SAN (multipathing):
>>>
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> sdg               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    53.09 
>>> 1006.67     0.50    4.63    0.00    4.63   4.59  49.60
>>> sdl               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    52.62  
>>> 997.85     0.44    4.04    0.00    4.04   4.04  43.60
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The above applies to HV + HVPVM modes using kernel 4.4 in the DomU.

Do you mean PV and PVHVM, instead?

>>> The following applies to a HV or PV DomU running kernel 3.12:
>>>
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-1              0.00     0.00   41.00 7013.00     0.73   301.16   
>>> 87.65   142.78   20.44    5.17   20.53   0.14 100.00
>>> xvdb              0.00     0.00   41.00 7023.00     0.73   301.59   
>>> 87.65   141.80   20.27    5.17   20.36   0.14 100.00
>>>
>>> (Which is better but still not great.)
>>>
>>> Any explanations on this one?

What happens when you use a recent linux kernel in the guest, like 4.18?

Do things like using blk-mq make a difference here (just guessing around)?

>> If you figure it out let us know, it's been on my todo list to work on
>> for a bit now.
>>
>> --Sarah
>
> Hey,
>
> Well, it's the stupid ring buffer with 11 slots with 4 kB each between
> domU and dom0. This gives a maximum request size of 88 sectors (0,5 kB
> each) = 44 kB.
>
> What's clear is that for modern storage like SSD arrays or NVMe disks,
> this simply won't cut it and Xen is a no-go...
>
> I'd love if someone could tell me something different and/or how to
> optimize.
>
> What still remains to be answered is the additional issue with low queue
> size (avgqu-sz).
>
> From your response I guess this may need to go to the Dev list instead
> of here (since noone seems to have a clue about obvious
> questions/benchmarks).
> I wonder what kind of workloads people run on Xen. Can't be much =D

These kind of remarks do not really help much if your goal would be to
motivate other people to think about these things together with you, get
better understanding and maybe find out things that can help all of us.

Thanks,
Hans

P.S. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warnock%27s_dilemma

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Re: Xen IO performance issues

Charles Gonçalves
I work with TPCx-V benchmark in Xen and even using pv I've noted that the overall benchmark performance was drastically small than using the same setup with KVM. 

Did not dig further into this since was not relevant for my work. But the reason could be same ....

On Sep 19, 2018 16:46, "Hans van Kranenburg" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,


On 09/19/2018 09:19 PM, marki wrote:
> On 2018-09-19 20:35, Sarah Newman wrote:
>> On 09/14/2018 04:04 AM, marki wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> We're having trouble with a dd "benchmark". Even though that probably
>>> doesn't mean much since multiple concurrent jobs using a benckmark
>>> like FIO for
>>> example work ok, I'd like to understand where the bottleneck is / why
>>> this behaves differently.
>>>
>>> In ESXi it looks like the following and speed is high: (iostat output
>>> below)
>>>
>>> (kernel 4.4)
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-5              0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00 
>>> 2048.00   142.66  272.65    0.00  272.65   1.95 100.00
>>> sdb               0.00     0.00    0.00  512.00     0.00   512.00 
>>> 2048.00   141.71  270.89    0.00  270.89   1.95 100.00
>>>
>>> # dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
>>> 8192000000 bytes (8.2 GB, 7.6 GiB) copied, 9.70912 s, 844 MB/s
>>>
>>> Now in a Xen DomU running kernel 4.4 it looks like the following and
>>> speed is low / not what we're used to:
>>>
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-0              0.00     0.00    0.00  100.00     0.00    99.00 
>>> 2027.52     1.45   14.56    0.00   14.56  10.00 100.00
>>> xvdb              0.00     0.00    0.00 2388.00     0.00    99.44   
>>> 85.28    11.74    4.92    0.00    4.92   0.42  99.20
>>>
>>> # dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
>>> 1376059392 bytes (1.4 GB, 1.3 GiB) copied, 7.09965 s, 194 MB/s

Interesting.

* Which Xen version are you using?
* Which Linux kernel version is being used in the dom0?
* Is this a PV, HVM or PVH guest?
* ...more details you can share?


>>> Note the low queue depth on the LVM device and additionally the low
>>> request size on the virtual disk.
>>>
>>> (As in the ESXi VM there's an LVM layer inside the DomU but it
>>> doesn't matter whether it's there or not.)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Inside Dom0 it looks like this:
>>>
>>> This is the VHD:
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-13             0.00     0.00    0.00 2638.00     0.00   105.72   
>>> 82.08    11.67    4.42    0.00    4.42   0.36  94.00
>>>
>>> This is the SAN:
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-0              0.00  2423.00    0.00  216.00     0.00   105.71 
>>> 1002.26     0.95    4.39    0.00    4.39   4.35  94.00
>>>
>>> And these are the individual paths on the SAN (multipathing):
>>>
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> sdg               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    53.09 
>>> 1006.67     0.50    4.63    0.00    4.63   4.59  49.60
>>> sdl               0.00     0.00    0.00  108.00     0.00    52.62  
>>> 997.85     0.44    4.04    0.00    4.04   4.04  43.60
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The above applies to HV + HVPVM modes using kernel 4.4 in the DomU.

Do you mean PV and PVHVM, instead?


>>> The following applies to a HV or PV DomU running kernel 3.12:
>>>
>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>> dm-1              0.00     0.00   41.00 7013.00     0.73   301.16   
>>> 87.65   142.78   20.44    5.17   20.53   0.14 100.00
>>> xvdb              0.00     0.00   41.00 7023.00     0.73   301.59   
>>> 87.65   141.80   20.27    5.17   20.36   0.14 100.00
>>>
>>> (Which is better but still not great.)
>>>
>>> Any explanations on this one?

What happens when you use a recent linux kernel in the guest, like 4.18?

Do things like using blk-mq make a difference here (just guessing around)?


>> If you figure it out let us know, it's been on my todo list to work on
>> for a bit now.
>>
>> --Sarah
>
> Hey,
>
> Well, it's the stupid ring buffer with 11 slots with 4 kB each between
> domU and dom0. This gives a maximum request size of 88 sectors (0,5 kB
> each) = 44 kB.
>
> What's clear is that for modern storage like SSD arrays or NVMe disks,
> this simply won't cut it and Xen is a no-go...
>
> I'd love if someone could tell me something different and/or how to
> optimize.
>
> What still remains to be answered is the additional issue with low queue
> size (avgqu-sz).
>
> From your response I guess this may need to go to the Dev list instead
> of here (since noone seems to have a clue about obvious
> questions/benchmarks).
> I wonder what kind of workloads people run on Xen. Can't be much =D

These kind of remarks do not really help much if your goal would be to
motivate other people to think about these things together with you, get
better understanding and maybe find out things that can help all of us.

Thanks,
Hans

P.S. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warnock%27s_dilemma


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Re: Xen IO performance issues

marki
In reply to this post by Hans van Kranenburg-2
Hello,

On 2018-09-19 21:43, Hans van Kranenburg wrote:

> On 09/19/2018 09:19 PM, marki wrote:
>> On 2018-09-19 20:35, Sarah Newman wrote:
>>> On 09/14/2018 04:04 AM, marki wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> We're having trouble with a dd "benchmark". Even though that
>>>> probably
>>>> doesn't mean much since multiple concurrent jobs using a benckmark
>>>> like FIO for
>>>> example work ok, I'd like to understand where the bottleneck is /
>>>> why
>>>> this behaves differently.
>>>>
>>>> Now in a Xen DomU running kernel 4.4 it looks like the following and
>>>> speed is low / not what we're used to:
>>>>
>>>> Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s    rMB/s    wMB/s
>>>> avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
>>>> dm-0              0.00     0.00    0.00  100.00     0.00    99.00 
>>>> 2027.52     1.45   14.56    0.00   14.56  10.00 100.00
>>>> xvdb              0.00     0.00    0.00 2388.00     0.00    99.44   
>>>> 85.28    11.74    4.92    0.00    4.92   0.42  99.20
>>>>
>>>> # dd if=/dev/zero of=/u01/dd-test-file bs=32k count=250000
>>>> 1376059392 bytes (1.4 GB, 1.3 GiB) copied, 7.09965 s, 194 MB/s
>
> Interesting.
>
> * Which Xen version are you using?

That particular version was XenServer 7.1 LTSR (Citrix). We also tried
the newer current release 7.6, makes no difference.
Before you start screaming:
XS eval licenses do not contain any support so we can't ask them.
People in Citrix discussion forums are nice but don't seem to know
details necessary to solve this.

> * Which Linux kernel version is being used in the dom0?

In 7.1 it is "4.4.0+2".
In 7.6 that would be "4.4.0+10".

> * Is this a PV, HVM or PVH guest?

In any case blkfront (and thus blkback) were being used (which seems to
transfer data by that ring structure I mentioned and which explains the
small block size albeit not necessarily the low queue depth).

> * ...more details you can share?

Well, not much more except that we are talking about Suse Enterprise
Linux 12 up to SP3 in the DomU here. We also tried RHEL 7.5 and the
result (slow single-threaded writes) was the same. Reads are not
blazingly fast either BTW.

>
>>>> Note the low queue depth on the LVM device and additionally the low
>>>> request size on the virtual disk.
>>>>
>>>> (As in the ESXi VM there's an LVM layer inside the DomU but it
>>>> doesn't matter whether it's there or not.)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The above applies to HV + HVPVM modes using kernel 4.4 in the DomU.
>
> Do you mean PV and PVHVM, instead?
>

Oups yes, in any case blkfront (and thus blkback) were being used.

>
> What happens when you use a recent linux kernel in the guest, like
> 4.18?

I'd have to get back to you on that. However, as long as blkback stays
the same I'm not sure what would happen.
In any case we'd want to stick with the OSes that the XS people support,
I'll have to find out if there are some with more recent kernels than
SLES or RHEL.

>
> Do things like using blk-mq make a difference here (just guessing
> around)?

Honestly I'd have to find out first what that is. I'll check that out
and will get back to you.

Best regards,
Marki

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Re: Xen IO performance issues

marki
On 2018-09-20 11:49, marki wrote:

> Hello,
>
> On 2018-09-19 21:43, Hans van Kranenburg wrote:
>>
>> Do things like using blk-mq make a difference here (just guessing
>> around)?
>
> Honestly I'd have to find out first what that is. I'll check that out
> and will get back to you.
>


Even though something seems to exist, it doesn't look like it's active
by default

# cat /sys/block/xvda/mq/0/active
0

There also does not seem to exist a parameter allowing to enable it:

# l /sys/module/xen_blkfront/parameters/
total 0
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    0 Sep 20 13:28 ./
drwxr-xr-x 7 root root    0 Sep 20 13:28 ../
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 Sep 20 13:28 max_indirect_segments
-r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 Sep 20 13:28 max_ring_page_order

All other layers have it enabled alright:

# cat
/sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:01.1/ata1/host0/scsi_host/host0/use_blk_mq
1
# cat
/sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:01.1/ata2/host1/scsi_host/host1/use_blk_mq
1
# cat /sys/module/scsi_mod/parameters/use_blk_mq
Y
# cat /sys/module/dm_mod/parameters/use_blk_mq
Y

I have tried guessing and setting xen_blkfront.use_blk_mq=1 in the
kernel parameters. No change.

# cat /sys/block/xvda/mq/0/active
0

I now also tried an Ubuntu 18 DomU (Kernel 4.15). Makes no differences.
Except for iostat now showing the actual request size in kilobytes (44)
and no longer in sectors (88).


BR,
Marki

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